Coffee Waffle and Sunstroke – Wivenhoe Trails and Spillway Common

“Accept the abundance,” the Cormorant Bay Café waitress ordered with a bow after placing a complimentary freshly brewed coffee next to my meal. Abundance sums up my three explorations in summer of the Wivenhoe Dam area, 80km west of Brisbane. To be honest, I would have been satisfied with much less abundance of sunshine and sweat while attempting to walk the 16km of trails. Continue reading

Celebrating Charlotte – A Spider Special

Halloween is being celebrated in some parts of the world and creepy spider images are often featured. This gives me a perfect excuse to share pictures  of my much maligned  eight-legged garden friends along with a backyard news update.  Actually, the real reason I am writing a creature post is because my Lamington National Park walk photographs were poor quality and I’d like to revisit the area to improve on them. If you like blood sucking parasites and reading about  lycra man suffering stay tuned for that story. Continue reading

A Platypus Quest: Six Mile Creek Discoveries

I have yet to see a platypus in the wild. I wonder how many Australians have. When I was told recently that a dead platypus had been found near Six Mile Creek in my local area, I had mixed feelings – excitement and surprise that they lived so close to me, and a little frustration and disappointment that a new supermarket complex and residential development being built right next to the creek may be responsible for their demise.

Since then I have headed down to the creek on a few occasions, hoping to catch sight of this unusual monotreme. I did come across some brown woolly animals and another rather hairy creature. The second species elicited a  screech  from me that was loud enough to bring the cricketers from the practice nets down to investigate. I was left a little red-faced by their concern. Not an uncommon occurrence for me, I can assure you. Continue reading

Pleasure and Pain – Mt Edwards, Moogerah Peaks

“Perhaps there’s no better act of simplification than climbing a mountain. For an afternoon, a day, or a week, it’s a way of reducing a complicated life into a simple goal. All you have to do is take one step at a time, place one foot in front of the other, and refuse to turn back until you’ve given everything you have.” -Ken Ilgunas

In my last post I was disappointed to miss out on attempting the Mt Maroon summit. What a difference a week can make to one’s mood. I’ve had the opportunity to de-stress with a mountain walk, make some nature discoveries on an old mining site and enjoy a sunrise walk at a new beach. I also had the pleasure of meeting  a Brisbane blogger I follow, who also enjoys photography and walking. So this week I am in the joyful position of having something fresh to write about… Continue reading

A Jungle Update: The Land of the Minibeasts

An exploration of the northern beaches of New South Wales with my daughter was the planned blog post this week but as I’ve had a busy few days I’m giving a quick mini update on the wild goings on in my backyard instead. The horror story involving deceptively innocent seagulls will come as promised, although it’s unlikely to live up to the hype I’ve created!

After reading The Shortest Hike in the World a few readers have asked for updates on the critters I share my life with. I aim to please whenever possible so armed with only an ancient camera for protection, I ventured forth bravely into the scary jungle that is my overgrown suburban garden. A machete would have been more useful. I’m sure the neighbours would be constantly on my doorstep complaining about my wilderness if they weren’t afraid of what beast they may encounter on the way. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Tortoises: Greenes Falls Rainforest Track – Mt Glorious

rainforest-trees

I contemplated calling this post, “The Slowest Hike in the World” as it took 4 ½ hours to cover a mere 4.3 km. New readers might be thinking it must have been an arduous hike involving rugged terrain, steep climbs or waist-deep mud. Older followers know me better than that. There’s a  reason why I am called mildly extreme rather than plain  extreme. Continue reading