Feathers, Flowers and Tomfoolery at Toohey’s Forest and Mt Gravatt Reserve

I am writing this post in a slightly sleep deprived state due to the antics of my furry friends, the nocturnal brushtail possums, Trichosurus vulpecula, which have been thundering across my roof more than usual lately.  I’m not sure what has caused this increase in activity but I’m hoping they take a possum chill-pill soon and allow me a little more uninterrupted sleep.   One of them likes to snooze on top of my open garage tilt-a-door, but during a gusty day recently, when the door started to flap, it was in danger of  becoming a possum pancake  so I had to encourage it out onto a tree. Continue reading

Deception and Delight: Brisbane Winter Wonders

“People trust their eyes above all else – but most people see what they wish to see, or what they believe they should see; not what is really there” – Zoe Marriot, Shadows on the Moon

I’ve discovered a rare species and as you can imagine, I’m thrilled! Here in the heart of Brisbane city I spotted the rarely seen Penguinadae deceptor-dartus, so named because of its amazing ability to transform from a roly-poly penguin… Continue reading

The Geese Have Gone and I Am Cheering: Sherwood Arboretum and Wetlands

Sherwood Arboretum Wetlands

Sherwood Arboretum Wetlands

Well, there has been some drama of late. A family member was struck by a car recently while cycling home from work. He was fortunate to survive the incident but now has injuries which will take about six months to heal.   The driver of the car was  at fault according to the police report and unfortunately this is not uncommon where I live. I’m quite disheartened by the car-centric culture in my country although there have been some improvements.

As Michael Reilly recently wrote in an article explaining 18 Reasons Why Registering Bicycles  is a Bad Idea, “Even among people who don’t ride for transport, a survey showed 60% would like to do so – but many say they are too scared.”  Yes, here in the Lucky Country, many of us are too scared to ride a bicycle. After a few close calls I have even curtailed my own cycling activity.

Now  let’s move onto something more cheerful… Continue reading

Blue Serendipity: Mt Glorious Delivers – D’Aguilar National Park

blue-tiger-feeding- rainforest

I have a small addiction. It’s not exactly a harmful one, but it can  distract me from working occasionally and result in some frustration. I’ll be  tapping away intently at my laptop until a characteristic fluttering movement in my peripheral vision causes immediate physiological and emotional responses. An increased heart and breathing rate accompanied by an idiotic grin and a sudden compulsion to leap up and grab the closest available camera heralds the onset of the maddening condition known as “take-a-picture-of-a-butterfly-itis.” This condition can be intensified if the butterfly happens to be blue, my favourite colour. I’ve been told that blue is meant to be soothing, however it doesn’t seem to have that effect on me when I see it on a butterfly.

Until recently, the hyperactive movements of Blue Triangle and Blue Tiger butterflies have eluded capture by my lens. Following their meandering flight through my garden has not led to photographic satisfaction, so much so that I had even renamed them the Blue Teasers. A recent series of events contributed to me achieving a much longed for state of blue delirium though. Continue reading

Tibrogargan and Beerburrum: Glass House Mountains Part II

Tibrogargan-Jack Ferris Lookout

“Spontaneity is a meticulously prepared art” – Oscar Wilde

Several months ago I wrote Ngungun: Glass House Mountains – Part I. Today’s post continues  my memories of this special area with a walk at Mt Tibrogargan and Mt Beerburrum. New followers or those old followers wishing to remind themselves of the geography and history of the region can read Part I here. Or if you prefer, check out the National Parks Site for more information. Mildly Extreme Jane is not feeling very well this week so she can’t guarantee any of this will make sense. I’ve lost some writing mojo, but as they say, “The blog must go on.” Perhaps grab a cup of coffee or something stronger before you start…

 I faced my nemesis while visiting Mt Tibrogargan.  Continue reading

Slaughter Falls, Mt Coot-tha: A Matter of Perspective

sunrise

We’re conditioned to think that our lives revolve around great moments. But great moments often catch us unaware – beautifully wrapped in what others may consider a small one. – Kent Nurburn

I pity the poor people who have to pay a small fortune to attend saunas. Here in sub-tropical Brisbane we get to live in one free for a few months of the year!   A few days ago, I spent the morning freestyling in my own perspiration in order to complete an album of pictures for this blog post. I’ve been to the Slaughter Falls area in Mt Coot-tha Forest a few times but I’ve never actually seen the falls flowing fast. After recent heavy rain, I was anticipating some breathtaking cascades. Was it worth it? I’ll let you decide… Continue reading

The Shortest Hike in the World

mantid

“Among the myrtles the mantids moved, lightly, carefully, swaying slightly, the quintessence of evil. They were lank and green, with chinless faces and monstrous globular eyes, frosty gold, with an expression of intense, predatory madness in them. The crooked arms, with their fringes of sharp teeth, would be raised in mock supplication to the insect world, so humble, so fervent, trembling slightly when a butterfly flew too close.” – Gerald Durrell, My Family and Other Animals.

It’s past midnight and the party is still going strong. It happens every night and I’m never invited. Instead, I lie tossing and turning, listening to their high-jinks, romantic interludes and  occasional fighting. That’s what happens when your backyard is a jungle in a street of manicured lawns and trimmed hedges. The possums move in! Continue reading